Edmonton warns taxpayers, 'Take a look at your pipes.' Homeowners struggle to cover costs when their out-of-sight, out-of-mind sewer connections col

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Edmonton warns taxpayers, 'Take a look at your pipes.'

Homeowners struggle to cover costs when their out-of-sight, out-of-mind sewer connections collapse, but there’s little the city can do to help, drainage officials said Wednesday.

“I live in a 1954 bungalow, I live in terror that the thing is going to go any day,” said Mayor Don Iveson, asking how homeowners should approach this.

If a home has PVC pipes, residents have no issue, said branch manager Chris Ward. If they have 60-year-old clay pipes, they need to look at replacing them. If they have “no corrode” or tar-paper pipes, they should get those relined now before they fail.

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Lakeshore West GO Train Westbound

Federal infrastructure funds flow to Ontario

In the meantime, while Edmonton looks to what's underfoot,Ontario is focusing on issues you can see. The federal treasury is doling out $1.49 billion worth of transit funding among cities in Ontario for track upgrades, new buses and improvements and accessibility upgrades to stations.

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Wrangell

Wrangell pipe break causes 20,000 gallon sewage spill into harbor

Thousands of gallons of raw sewage were discharged into Wrangell's harbor Monday during repairs to a broken sewer main in the Southeast Alaska city.

Amber Al-Haddad, Wrangell's director of public works, said Tuesday afternoon that the source of the break — a fracture in a ductile iron pipe — was 'a little surprising' given industry expectations for its durability.

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3hMET WaterMainInfrastructure0722 Gallery

Replacing Toronto’s aging watermain system becoming a top priority

238 kilometres worth of sewer and watermain replacement is scheduled for completion by the end of 2016.

It’s the thinner walled spun cast-iron models located outside of downtown which are corroding and breaking down much faster, says Michael D’Andrea, director of the city’s engineering and construction services.

(Spun cast pipe is) the worst infrastructure in the ground and when a watermain breaks in the winter, it’s usually one of those,” he said.

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Spending billions of dollars on replacing well-aged watermains and other infrastructure projects may not be the most exciting thing in Toronto’s budget.

But according to this editorial, it’s something that should have been a top priority long time ago.

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Comments or questions?

Call or email anytime.

Veso Sobot, P.Eng
Ipex Management Inc.
veso.sobot@ipexna.com

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